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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
these jobs. foreign policy is my passion yet actually i'm also a mother. i want to be at home for the last five years that my children are at home. it was hard for me to admit that to myself. in the end i had to recognize, both as a matter of need and want, that my life was going to go in a different direction than i had always expected it would. i had to listen to that. i had to, in the end say, wow, maybe i'm not the same person i thought i was. i know this is the right thing for me to do. >> what was the most difficult part of your job in relation to balancing it with your role as a mother? >> it was just that sense so often where particularly my oldest son really needed me home, needed us both there. and i was in another place. i could not do anything about that. you know, i think that is true for millions of parents. certainly millions of women. i realize the stress was just overwhelming of knowing i had a child who really did need me and i couldn't respond. i couldn't live up to that responsibility. >> after you came to your decision you must have talked to secretary clinton. she's a
republican president of the united states. the league well within the mainstream of american foreign policy. the senate has to ratify it. it and 80 of them have said that they want the united states to ratify the treaty and join the league of nations under some conditions. 80 is well more than enough to make ratifications. >> they need two-thirds. >> 64 or -- ratification is not hard in the scenario. you have 80. you need 64 or 65. okay. the deal baker. they shouldn't be deal breaker. very few people view them as deal breaker. he knows wilson. and lodge says wilson, you know, he might accept reservation on the principle. we can get the ratification easily if you accept it. and wilson says i will never except the reservations. lodge at the reds elevation of the treaty. lodge is the republican. >> from the other party. >> that's right he's the republican the leader of the republican party in the senate. the most influential voice. >> the partisan break down. >> it's pretty closely split. there's a democratic i believe there's a democratic majority at this point. the key is 50eu6. it you canno
a half of his face because he's brilliant domestically, troubled on foreign policy. but he had a good side image so i think you could have half of him. >> can you do that? >> they can do do anything they want. >> she's the one -- >> half a face. >> so we've already talked about fdr. we've talked about truman. let's talk about reagan, a guy who when many people on the left thought he stumbled into office as an accident of history, few could expect this guy to be as transformative as he was. i would guess most historians 100 years from now will talk about the 20th century, they'll talk about fdr and reagan. >> well, there's no question. having created -- i mean, fdr creating a generation of liberal followers and reagan creating a generation of conservative followers, changing the whole idea of what we thought about government, whether one agrees or not, dealing with the cold war, being able to finally bring about that partnership with gorbachev, you know, take that wall down, the strength he showed, the communication ability, the fact that people felt optimistic during his time, the fac
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
seem to be a foreign-policy, a policy foreign to the roast great deliberative body. >> to think of people who ran in 2010 and got elected with the people who ran before it ended now ascended to of leadership leave no with a solution or they were elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> again, from the class of 2010 and now i refer to the 87 freshman, the so-called tea party class of the 112 congress, their belief is they are doing precisely what the people who elected them wish to do, which is rollback obama initiatives to cut spending. a lot of them thought the debt ceiling should not be increased under any circumstances and to that degree feel like i was. they basically believe their job is to obstruct barack obama and once there is a republican president in place from the two pass this initiative secreted better business climate, more and more deregulation committee funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. of course to flash forward a day, i suspect we'll talk about the debt ceiling fiasco of 2011. after that summer undertaken to the b
world and the tendency of american foreign policy at the time to think that you could fix and watch with a hammer. yeah, so we did. we went on the road and in many ways had our faith in the american process and our country restored by meeting some wonderful, committed people, who really mean extremely well and have the future of this country in their hearts and minds. but we raised the better part of $10 million, and it ain't right, you know? i do not know a lot about election reform, but it seems it breaks into two areas. one is the campaign and the other is the actual election itself. fixing the campaign is going to be tough, trying to get the money out of it, trying to get some forms in the place of our debates that actually give us a clear idea of who the candidate is and what they intend for the country -- that is a difficult and tall order. trying to streamline it so that it does not take two years to run for public office. these are difficult things to accomplish, and i do not know how we go about it. it seems as though there is a sign of election reform, the process itself,
at the biggest foreign policy events of the year. >> i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay. i went down to the liberal party. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought it was acucute. she asked me why and i made an early case for lindsey and i made the case against his opponent. she handed me a box of pastry. i took a back to headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics and i was told you can keep the money. >> david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. fall by the all women delegation of new hampshire. then growing up in the white house. tonight on c-span. >> there was a forum on women in leadership. hilda solis spoke about her career and serving in the obama administration. >> good morning. they come from los angeles and cleveland and baltimore. poor and white. each of them have one thing in common. they are all successful. each rose to the top of their field in the arts or politics or sports. we will talk
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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